Acanthus, bear's breeches

Acanthus 'Tasmanian Angel'

$11.95   Commonly known as bear's breeches, this perennial likes morning sun and afternoon shade. Its large green leaves are mottled in creamy white to light yellow. Because of the leaves' size, it is a plant best grown in soil that is moister than average. Its mature size is 2 ft x 2 ft, with taller flowers. Grows well in USDA zones 7 - 10.
yarrow, Achillea 'Anthea'

Achillea 'Anthea'

$6.95   (PP# 8,828) This yarrow has ferny, serrated, silver leaves, sulphur-yellow flowers and an upright habit. The flower stems reach a height of twenty-four inches. Especially valuable because she has demonstrated a stronger tolerance of rainy, humid conditions than other yarrows, while retaining her ability to withstand drought. Flowering begins in early summer and persists for many weeks. USDA hardiness zones 4 - 8.
aeonium

Aeonium 'Variegata'

$6.95   This unusual, variegated plant is derived from one that is native to the Canary Islands where winter temperatures stay well above freezing. In summer it likes lots of sunlight. Being very drought tolerant, make a note to let it dry out well between infrequent watering. Reaches several feet tall in a few years.
dark leaf aeonium

Aeonium 'Zwartkop'

$8.95   This succulent is prized for its dark, uniquely colored leaves that in strong light will be purplish black. It is a branching shrub that will reach three to four feet in height over several years. Its architectural shape contrasts well with most other plants, and is great planted in containers. Let it dry out between waterings. Cannot take much cold, although it is said to survive to 25 or 30°F.
Agapanthus 'Ed Carman'

Agapanthus 'Ed Carman'

$17.95   Strap-like leaves are green, with variegation running the length of the leaves that can be a golden-yellow to creamy white depending on season and garden conditions. The creamy variegation is echoed in the pure white flowers that come in heads of round clusters. Mature height of 2 or 2½ feet. Needs winter protection from frost. Ed Carman was widely known in California for his nursery's collection of unusual plants.
Agapanthus 'Summer Gold'

Agapanthus 'Summer Gold'

$11.95   A smaller scale plant than the agapanthuses usually seen in gardens, both the leaves and flowers of this have lovely colors. The leaves are striped in creamy yellow. They are evergreen. The flowers are a light to medium blue and low at a height of twelve to eighteen inches. This lily-of-the-Nile is hardy to USDA zone 8 (+10° to +20°F). Introduced from Japan by Barry Yinger. Where winters are colder than Zone 8, it would make a good container plant.
Agapanthus 'Northern Star'

Agapanthus 'Northern Star'

$11.95   Also known as lily-of-Nile, the round heads of medium blue, star-like flowers bloom profusely in July and August atop stems of 24 to 30 inches. The deciduous leaves are very distinct, having dark violet blue/black bases. One of the most cold tolerant agapanthuses, it is hardy as far north as USDA zone 6. Click here to find your USDA hardiness zone. When cold weather arrives in fall, the leaves turn yellow and disappear until spring returns.
Agapanthus 'Polar Ice'

Agapanthus 'Polar Ice'

$11.95   The white flowers have a very light touch of violet and bloom for many weeks in July and August. The round heads of blossoms are five to six inches across on top of long green stems. They make a good cut flower. One of the hardiest of agapanthuses, it is cold hardy to USDA zone 6. In summer it relishes frequent watering, however when dormant in winter, it needs ground that drains well to be able to survive the cold. One of the finest and hardiest of the lilies-of-the-Nile.
Allium sikkimense

Allium sikkimense

$8.95   This low growing (6 inches) ornamental onion has sky blue flowers in summer. With its narrow leaves and low height, it is suitable for a rock garden or planted with other low growing flowers at the front edge of a bed. Once established, it is undemanding. It is also known as Allium kansuense. USDA zones 6 - 8 in the East, Zones 6 - 9 in the West.
Anemanthele lessoniana

Anemanthele lessoniana

$6.95   Poplularly known as pheasant-tail grass, this grows to a moderate height between 2 and 2½ feet. It is clump forming and does not run at the root. The habit is soft with the top of the grass splaying over a bit and gracefully arching. A major highlight of the plant is its russet colors (although young plants may start out green). Grow it in full sun and allow it to dry out between waterings. Native to New Zealand. Hardy to 10°F. Also known as Stipa arundinacea.
dwarf snapdragon, Antirrhinum glutinosum

Antirrhinum glutinosum 'Gummy'

$6.95   This low, moderately spreading perennial has gray leaves covered in hairs and sticky stems that spreads eight to fourteen inches wide and grows four to eight inches tall. It does well either planted out in the garden in spring or grown at the edge of a container garden where it will flow over the edge charmingly. As a native of Spain it can take severe heat, and will flower from the beginning of summer until frost. Flowers of light yellow to creamy white, are one-inch long. USDA zones 8 to 11.
Arabis 'Variegata'

Arabis alpina subsp. caucasica 'Variegata'

$6.95   Popularly known as rock cress, this unusual form has grayish-green leaves edged in cream that are evergreen, and can light up a garden year around. White, four-petaled half-inch wide flowers appear from early spring until the weather starts warming up. It needs only average soil. The soil having good drainage is particularly important. Doubly colorful with its flowers and foliage, it does good duty in a rock garden, as an edging plant, and planted in the crevices of a rock wall. Native to mountains in Europe, its can survive winter cold to USDA zone 3.
Armeria 'Little Penny'

Armeria 'Little Penny'

$7.95   Known popularly as sea thrift or sea pink, this dwarf grows as a tight bun, expanding wider with each succeeding year. Low, small clusters of pinkish flowers come in May, June and intermittently thereafter. The leaves are evergreen, and during winter turn reddish. Especially small (and cute). USDA zone 4.
Aster alpinus 'Pinkie'

Aster alpinus 'Pinkie'

$6.95   'Pinkie' is a low growing plant that is notable for its flowering in late spring, rather than in fall as is usual for most asters. This is a selected color form with bright pink flowers with golden eyes. We propagate it vegetatively so the flowers will be uniform in color. Because its parents are native to mountains in Europe, it is better suited for growing in cooler climates rather than where summers are warmer. It is especially suited for a rock garden, or planted towards the front of a flower bed. USDA hardiness zones 4 - 7 in the East, zones 4 - 8 in the West. And even farther north to zone 3 with snow cover or other protection.
Aster 'Alma Potschke'

Aster nova-angliae
'Alma Pötschke'

$6.95   This aster reaches four feet tall (staking may be necessary) and blooms from late summer into mid-autumn, making it an excellent choice for an eye-popping splash of color at season's end. Not only do butterflies love it, but it makes a good cut flower. It thrives in a wide range of conditions, doing best it full sun and an evenly moist soil. USDA zones 3 - 8, to Zone 9 in the West. A winter mulch is recommended.
Aster 'Tiny Tot'

Aster novi-belgii 'Tiny Tot'

$6.95   'Tiny Tot' is a very dwarf form of New York aster. Its height is half a foot, growing bushy, in a rounded bun. From late summer into October small purplish daisy-like flowers will cover the plant. The species name, novi-belgii, derives from 'New Belgium,' that was an early name for New York. USDA zones 3 - 8, to zone 9 in the West.
Aster 'Napsbury'

Aster tongolensis 'Napsbury'

$6.95   The growth of Aster 'Napsbury' is low and spreading. In early summer numerous stems rise to 12 - 15 inches. Each stem carries a large, single daisy of violet-blue with a bright golden-orange eye. The petals are thin and reflex downwards as they age. Easy to grow in average garden conditions. USDA zones 4 - 8.
Astilboides tabularis

Astilboides tabularis

$10.95   This used to be named as a Rodgersia. It needs similar care - moister ground than usual and filtered sunlight or afternoon shade. It has a different appearance, having even larger, completely rounded leaves of 2 or 3 feet wide on a full sized plant. Taller than the leaves are its clusters of fragrant, white flowers from summer lasting well into fall that resemble the flowers of Astilbe. The foliage will be two to three feet tall, with flower stems from three to five feet tall. Is very striking alongside a pond. Hardy in USDA zones 5 - 9 in the West and zones 5 - 7 in the East.
Aurinia 'Dudley Nevill Variegated'

Aurinia (Alyssum)
'Dudley Nevill Variegated'

$8.95   An easy-to-grow, choice perennial that thrives in full sun and hot, exposed sites. It needs soil that is well drained and low in fertility because rich soil promotes sprawling, floppy growth. Rather than growing tall, it grows as an ever-widening mat. We recommend shearing it back lightly just after flowering. Clusters of small, bright apricot flowers cover the plant in spring. The leaves are gray-green edged in cream and are semi-evergreen. Hardy in USDA zones 3 to 7 in the eastern half of the U.S. and hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9 in the West.
Bergenia ciliata

Bergenia ciliata

$10.95   This uncommonly seen groundcover is adaptable to very dry shade and moister shade. While most bergenias are evergreen, Bergenia ciliata drops its leaves over winter. Take a closer look to note the light fuzz of soft hairs that cover the leaves and the leaf stems. The garden writer, Christopher Lloyd, described this species as quote, “beautiful,” in his book on garden foliage. We agree. Very undemanding once established. It grows well in USDA zones 5 - 8, and also zones 9 & 10 in the West.
Bergenia ciliata ssp. ligulata

Bergenia ciliata ssp. ligulata

$10.95   To quote Graham Stuart Thomas, “the leaves have a hairy margin and are broad and rounded ... The flowers appear early in dense heads, opening out into graceful sprays; they are nearly white but have a pretty contrast in the rosy red calyces.” This has sparse hairs on its leaf surfaces, with more of its hairs on its leaf edges, and the edges being ruffled. USDA zones 5 - 8, and also zones 9 & 10 in the West.
Bergenia 'Tubby Andrews'

Bergenia 'Tubby Andrews'

$10.95   This very cold hardy perennial has evergreen leaves of green and creamy yellow in summer. When cold weather arrives in fall the coloring changes to green and various tints of pink to darker red. The colder the days become, the richer the coloring. As warm weather returns the following spring, the colors revert to creamy yellow and green on the new leaves. Although the plant demands little attention from year to year, we divide it every few years because the variegation is most colorful on a younger plant and becomes more subdued after a few years on an older plant. Pink flowers show in spring, and again in fall. USDA zones 4 - 7 in the East, 4 - 9 in the West.
Calceolaria arachnoidea

Calceolaria arachnoidea

$8.95   The contrast between the gray, felty, spoon-shaped leaves of this plant and its round, darkly purple flowers is dramatic. Coming from from the Andes of Chile, at elevations of 10,000 ft., it can take winter cold to USDA zone 6. In Chile it is often covered by snow in winter. However in your garden it won't survive if the ground is soggy wet in winter. The flowers are on stems several inches above the foliage. The plant will be two feet tall by slightly less wide. It starts to flower in early summer and continues on to the first frosts of fall.
Campanula 'Blue Waterfall'

Campanula 'Blue Waterfall'

$6.95   (PP# 13,161) Mat-forming growth to eight inches tall that cascades attractively over the edge of precipices. When trailing down a wall or over the edge of a hanging basket, its violet-blue flowers (lighter in the center) have a lovely effect. With a season from early to late summer. 'Blue Waterfall' will reach a foot wide during its first year and by its second year reach two feet across. Lightly shearing it as new growth appears in early spring is recommended. USDA zones 4 - 7 (and zones 8 and 9 in the West).
Campanula 'Elizabeth Oliver'

Campanula cochlearifolia 'Elizabeth Oliver'

$8.95   The double flowers of this elfin plant are small and a very light blue in color. Popularly called fairies thimbles, they show for many weeks in late spring in warmer climates, and in summer to fall in northern gardens. The plant's height is four inches, and it spreads modestly without over-crowding its neighbors. It is quite cold hardy, surviving winters where temperatures may drop to minus 20°F, or to minus 40°F if there is snow cover.

Campanula fenestrellata

$6.95   A species of bellflower native to Southeastern Europe, it is found growing among rocks in hills and mountains. And bearing violet-blue flowers for many weeks in summer. Its growth habit is as a compact mound to a height of six inches. Cold hardy to -10°F. Best grown where summers are not too hot or humid.
Campanula 'Blue Wonder'

Campanula x haylodgensis 'Blue Wonder'

$7.95   Double violet flowers bloom in summer on this low bellflower that is a cross between two species, C. cochlearifolia and C. carpatica. Its flowers are about twice the size of Campanula 'Elizabeth Oliver's' blossoms. And they show well, facing upwards and outwards. Small in stature, growing about 4 inches tall, and very cold hardy, to -20°F.
Campanula 'Boule de Neige'

Campanula persicifolia 'Boule de Neige'

$8.95   Pure white, double flowers that are round and relatively large, bloom from early to mid summer on thin stems fifteen to twenty-four inches in height. The flowers are large and heavy enough to require that stems be staked, otherwise their weight will make it hard for a stem to remain upright during gusts and rains. Although the flower stems grow fairly tall, the rest of the plant is much lower and spreading. And spreads rapidly enough to require dividing every two or three years. USDA zones 3 - 7 (and including 8 and 9 in the West).
Campanula 'Chettle Charm'

Campanula persicifolia 'Chettle Charm'

$6.95   Among bellflowers, this species is distinct for its tall, thin graceful habit and large bell-shaped flowers. This particular plant has flowers of white, beautifully edged in pale lavender. The height of the flower stems will be to thirty inches. And they make a superlative cut flower for your home. They are the perfect length for a vase and have a long life as a cut flower. Their subtle coloring compliments most any arrangement. Quite cold hardy, to USDA zone 4 (-30 to -20°F). Unfortunately it is not a plant for the deep South.
Campanula 'Sarastro'

Campanula 'Sarastro'

$8.95   The color of this flower is unusual — a smokey grape-purple. It is a very nice hybrid between two species, C. punctata and C. trachelium. It reaches a moderate height of eighteen inches with a long flowering season in summer, and with flower stems that are strong enough not to require staking. Its moderate growth is not rampant. All in all, a wonderful plant to add to a flower garden! USDA zones 3 - 9.
Campanula scheuchzeri

Campanula scheuchzeri

$6.95   (pronounced 'skook-zer-i) This species of bellflower has purplish-blue blossoms, growing as a low clump of leaves with flower stems of six to ten inches. It is a good size for a rock garden or towards the front of a garden bed. Spreading vigorously wider with new shoots coming from underground, it is not particular about its soil, although it would like to be kept moist through summer. Grows well in partial shade to full sun. USDA zones 4 - 7, and zones 8 and 9 in the West. The Latin name of the species honors the Swiss botanist, Johann Jakob Scheuchzer (1672 - 1733).
Caryopteris 'Summer Sorbet'

Caryopteris 'Summer Sorbet'

$10.95   The leaves of this low shrub are two or three inches long, green with broad bright yellow margins. They have a spicy scent when rubbed, and deer avoid eating them. During the later part of summer clusters of blue flowers decorate the branches. A plant grows to about three feet high and wide. It is deciduous, dropping its leaves in fall. In August, the combination of blue flowers and golden-edged leaves is especially attractive. USDA zones 6 - 8 in the East, to zone 9 in the West.
Clematis marmoraria

Clematis marmoraria

$8.95   This creeping very low growing clematis was given to us by Rick Lupp of Mt. Tahoma Nursery. To quote his description, "dwarf evergreen mounds of pinnately lobed, dark-green foliage. Clusters of 1½-inch blooms are white flushed green in bud. Our original stock came from wild seed collected by Steve Newall and has been kept isolated to maintain a true, non-hybrid line. New Zealand." Since receiving the plant from Mt. Tahoma Nursery, we continue to propagate it vegetatively to keep the strain pure and non-hybrid. Will spread underground. The height of the flowers is to four inches, the foliage less high. Cold hardy to at least USDA zone 7 and possibly colder, but how much more we do not know.
Convallaria 'Aureovariegata'

Convallaria majalis 'Aureovariegata'

$8.95   Lily-of-the-valley is an attractive old fashioned ground cover for large shady areas. Small purplish "eyes" appear at ground level in early spring, that develop into eight-inch long pointed green leaves that are striped lengthwise with creamy markings. Highly fragrant bell-shaped white flowers come in spring. While tolerant of most soil conditions, moist soil that is rich and slightly acidic is preferred for these woodland natives. Plants multiply rapidly in favorable conditions, and should not be planted if their spreading would be a problem. Occasionally a shoot with all-green leaves will appear that should be removed to keep your spreading colony well clothed in these striped leaves.
Convolvulus cneorum

Convolvulus cneorum

$8.95   This low bush, with gray leaves and one-inch pearly white flowers with pale pink stripes on the backs is too-little-seen. It is evergreen and the leaves are downy, so the plant is drought resistant. And also long flowering, throughout summer. With a height of eighteen to twenty-four inches and slightly greater width, it is a native of Mediterranean limestone hills, and enjoys a hot sunny position in a rock garden where fertility is fairly low and drainage is quick. Give it a once-a-year shearing as it begins to grow in spring to give it a good shape and keep it from becoming leggy. It is winter hardy in USDA zones 8 - 11, or to zone 7 with protection.
Convolvulus mauritanicus

Convolvulus mauritanicus

$6.95   Not a weed, this is low and spreading, but never too fast. The lavender flowers appear in waves all summer on older plants. At night the flowers spiral-up to close like little blue umbrellas. Prefers sun but will take light shade. Grows three inches high and spreads to eighteen inches. Survives to 0°F (USDA zone 7a or 6b).
Corydalis lutea

Corydalis lutea

$6.95   Growing eight to twelve inches tall, the texture of this plant is delicate with its lacey fern-like leaves and golden flowers. It is one of the longest blooming perennials in the garden. It spreads abundantly to naturalize in shady areas, however it's not much of a weed and is easily removed where it's not wanted. It seems to be more popular in Europe than here in North America. Hardy to USDA zone 5.
Corydalis ochroleuca

Corydalis ochroleuca

$6.95   Clusters of white and yellow blossoms with filligreed leaves of green. This is a long-blooming, shade-loving flower, beginning its season in spring that can continue through summer and on into fall. A single plant of this may not bloom that long, however a group or colony likely will. A single plant of Corydalis ochroleuca is not long lived, but the seeds that it drops will sprout easily, and within a couple of years establish a self-perpetuating colony. Height of about a foot. Growing well even in dry shade. Cold hardy to USDA zone 5.
Cytisus battandieri

Cytisus battandieri

$12.95   This uncommon low tree has clusters of fragrant yellow floweres in early summer, bringing to mind the fruity scent of pineapples. The semi-evergeen foliage is silver-gray and attractive. It is very drought tolerant, and reaches a mature height of ten to twenty feet. When in flower, passers-by have a hard time guessing what it might be, it's so little seen here. For USDA zones 7 - 10. Other names it goes by are Moroccan broom or Argyrocytisus. Limited quantity.
Deinanthe 'Blue Wonder'

Deinanthe caerulea 'Blue Wonder'

$10.95   Growing as a clump to eighteen inches tall, this needs partial shade and soil that will not dry out too much. It is related to hydrangeas, although it doesn't grow as a shrub but sprouts from the ground each spring with large, broad and textured leaves of green. In July and August flowers of light lavender appear at about the same height as the leaves. Its flowering season is long, with new buds opening in succession. Each flower is between an inch and two inches across and faces outwards or nods slightly downwards. It is native to woodlands in China. Hardy to −5°F.
Dianthus 'Chomley Farran'

Dianthus 'Chomley Farran'

$15.95   Harking back to an old Flemish still-life, the fuchsia-red and violet-gray bi-colored flowers are large and fragrant. It is said to have appeared as a natural sport of a crimson border carnation in an Irish garden only a short few years ago. Each flower is about an inch and a half wide, fully double, on a stem of twelve inches. Hardy to USDA zone 6. Needs full sun and well drained soil. The bluish-gray leaves are large and evergreen.
Erodium absinthoides

Erodium absinthoides

$8.95   Clusters of beautifully light pink flowers decorate the finely textured leaves of grayish green. Once established in a garden this plant is drought resistant. USDA zones 6 - 9. As a side note, the sexes occur separately -- the plants we offer are all females. Native to parts of southeastern Europe and Sicily.
Erodium cheilanthifolium

Erodium cheilanthifolium

$8.95   Creamy flowers have a delicate tracery of darker veins and two rich purplish blazes on the upper two petals. Long flowering and undemanding, this is a long lived perennial. Do not crowd it too closely with taller perennials, but allow it enough room to get lots of air and sunlight. It needs well drained soil to be long lived. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 9.
Erodium chrysanthum

Erodium chrysanthum

$8.95   From Greece, this yellow storksbill or heronsbill needs at least a half day of sunlight for healthy growth. In hot summer climates, it would like afternoon shade. It has light pastel yellow flowers beginning early in summer and again in fall. It flowers better in a poor, lean soil. With water conservation a growing need this is one plant that would fulfill your desire for a plant that thrives in a dry or xeric landscape. Height will be five inches with a spread of twelve inches. Hardy to USDA zone 5. Its leaves are lacey and grayish.
Erodium 'Natasha'

Erodium x kolbianum 'Natasha'

$8.95   Small in scale, this plant has lacey, feathery gray leaves and pale pink flowers with purple veins and purple blotches on the upper two petals. Its height is two or three inches, with the flowers another two or three inches above. Grows easily in the sunny, open garden. Quickly draining soil is best for its longterm survival over winter. Hardy to USDA zone 5.
Eryngium agavifolium

Eryngium agavifolium

$8.95   The sword-like shiny leaves, three inches wide at the base and edged with softly-serrated teeth are evergreen. Flower stems to three feet are topped by prickly tan thimbles of flowers. Drought tolerant due to its deep roots. Its native home is the grasslands of Argentina. With age it will grow into quite a thick clump. Hardy to USDA zone 7. Eryngiums are also called sea hollies. They all have spiny, prickly leaves.
Eryngium maritimum

Eryngium maritimum

$8.95   A sun-loving perennial with large leaves colored a chalky gray-green, this sea holly grows twelve to eighteen inches tall. Large thimble-like clusters of flowers show towards the later half of summer, surrounded by a spiky ruff of gray bracts and highlighted with touches of amethyst. The plant is very drought tolerant, as its thick thong-like roots reach deeply into the ground. Used in the past as an herb and vegetable, the boiled or roasted roots being very nutritious and with a flavor similar to the taste of chestnuts. Hardy USDA zones 5 - 11.
Fuchsia fulgens 'Variegata'

Fuchsia fulgens 'Variegata'

$8.95   Rarely offered, this upright, rounded shrub grows to a size of three tall by four feet wide when planted outdoors. Its roots survive to USDA Zone 8 (and even to Zone 7 in favored locations). It has flowers from summer to fall colored in salmony pink, cream and orange-red, each flower being long and pendant. This species of fuchsia is native to Mexico. Older plants have tuberous roots resembling the roots of a dahlia. USDA hardiness zones 8 - 10.
Fuchsia 'Lottie Hobby Variegated

Fuchsia 'Lottie Hobby Variegated'

$8.95   A small leaved upright fuchsia with tiny pink flowers, this has leaves of green and white. In a window that receives morning light it would be happy in a small pot on the window sill. In summer it can be moved outdoors. It would also be a nice addition to a mixed container of flowering plants. Cold hardy to USDA zones 9 and 10, and possibly zone 8 with protection.
Fuchsia procumbens 'Variegata'

Fuchsia procumbens 'Variegata'

$8.95   This is a very curious little plant, a low growing and prostrate shrub from New Zealand, that doesn't look much like a typical fuschia. The leaves are small, rounded and irregularly mixed with cream, pink and green. The flowers are upright, not drooping as is usually seen, and are colored amazingly in yellow and purplish-red, with blue pollen. Established roots are hardy to 10°F.
Geranium 'Mrs. Kendall Clark'

Geranium pratense 'Mrs. Kendall Clark'

$9.95   Lovely pastel lavender-blue flowers with chalky white veins are held above the foliage of finely divided, green leaves. Her mature height is 2+ feet tall by 3 feet wide, and she has a long season of bloom, beginning in late spring. Grows well in clay soil. USDA zones 4 - 8, and zone 9 in the West.
Helleborus 'Janet Starnes'

Helleborus 'Janet Starnes'

$10.95   New crop available starting in April. Named for plantswoman Janet Starnes of Molalla, Oregon, who found the original in a batch of seedlings. The shining blue-green leaves are dusted with galaxies of white and dark green stars. New leaves, almost cream colored, are fringed with pink; older leaves darken to a marbled green. Clouds of soft green flowers in early sping. Blooms on the previous year's growth. The flowers are showy, but the main attraction is the unusual foliage. Some gardeners cut off the flowers at the ground in early spring to allow a better view of the creamy colored new growth. Cold hardy to -10°F
Hemerocallis fulva 'Kwanso Variegata'

Hemerocallis fulva 'Kwanso Variegata'

$13.95   (variegated, double-flowered daylily) This plant is named following the guidance of the book, The Daylily: A Guide for Gardeners, by John P. Peat and Ted L. Petit. Having double flowers of orange, once it reaches flowering size a plant will spread quickly by underground shoots, so it requires effort to keep it within bounds. And it has been criticized for sometimes having sideshoots that are all-green. We notice this with our plants, and discard any all-green sideshoots when they first show in spring. In any case the plants we send will have striped leaves, so you will be off to a good start ! Cold hardy to -35°F.
Hemerocallis 'Little Minor'

Hemerocallis 'Little Minor'

$10.95   The nursery that sold us our first plant of this petite daylily in 1992, Montrose Nursery in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is no longer offering plants by mail-order. It is one of several fine nurseries from the 1980's and 90's that we happily remember and miss. To quote their catalog, “we are delighted to be able to offer this charming daylily. It is an old cultivar, small enough to be suitable for a rock garden with scapes only 1' or less. It blooms very early in mid-spring and then again in the fall with yellow, fragrant flowers.” USDA Zones 3 - 10.
Herniaria 'Sea Foam'

Herniaria glabra 'Sea Foam'

$6.95   At first glance it looks to be a variegated thyme, with its tiny green leaves edged in cream and low, creeping habit. But it is more adaptable than thyme, growing in full sun or partial shade, and growing farther south. A very undemanding plant, its rate of spread is not too fast. And because it is so low, it is an excellent choice for a groundcover in a variety of situations and adaptable to many locations. Although not good for heavy shade, it does well in partial shade, making a good groundcover under taller plants when the light is partial sun and partial shade. Hardy as far north as USDA zone 4b, it also grows well in the South.
Hippeastrum x johnsonii

Hippeastrum x johnsonii

$14.95   Popularly called Saint Joseph's lily, this relative of the florists' amaryllis has trumpet flowers of rich scarlet with a creamy heart in late spring. Growing from a bulb, it is naturalized in gardens in southern California and the Deep South, and is undemanding in climates warm enough for its survival. To flower well it needs at least a half day of sunlight. In time a plant will produce many smaller bulbs around itself. Lightly fragrant, several flowers are produced per stem. Needs well drained soil. It is claimed to grow to USDA Zone 5 by at least one authority. We cannot verify this, but know for certain that it survives to at least USDA zone 7.
Iris foetidissima 'Variegata'

Iris foetidissima 'Variegata'

$10.95   Prefering shade over sun, the dark green leaves irregularly striped in creamy white will turn yellow if planted in too much light. They reach a height of eighteen inches. Flowering is infrequent on this variegated plant, the flowers being pale lilac and amber. The colorful leaves are evergreen and decorate the garden all year. In gardens where winter temperatures drop into the teens Fahrenheit, the leaves may be damaged and need to be cut back in late winter. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.
Iris graminea

Iris graminea

$8.95   In May small reddish purple flowers nestle among the dark green, arching leaves. At close hand they are scented of plums or apricots, not strongly, but lightly. Interesting seed pods follow in fall that have narrow, slightly winged ridges. This iris grows well in average soil. It prefers partial shade. Twelve to sixteen inches tall. Cold hardy to USDA zone 5.
Iris japonica 'Aphrodite'

Iris japonica 'Aphrodite'

$8.95   From Japan, this woodland iris needs shade. Pale blue flowers, several to a stem open in spring. They are fringed and there are spots of orange and yellow dotted at the base of the falls. They are an inch to an inch and a half across and have something of an exotic look to them, a bit orchid-like. Plants will spread moderately by thin rhizomes. The leaves are equally streaked in green and cream. Height of the plant is ten to twelve inches. Hardy in USDA zones 7 - 9, although it can survive to zone 5 in a protected location.
Iris lazica

Iris lazica

$10.95   The flowers of this iris are a medium purple, and bloom from late winter to early spring on stems about eight inches tall. Their appearance resembles the flowers of the other winter-blooming iris we grow, Iris unguicularis, except the the three petals of I. lazica roll down and are pendant towards their outer tips. A second difference is that the evergreen leaves of I. lazica are broader. Prefers partial shade to growing in full sun. USDA zones 7 and 8, and zones 9 and 10 along the West Coast.
Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'

Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'

$8.95   Attractive whether in bloom or out of bloom because of its broad, sword-like leaves that are striped in green and white. They are semi-evergreen. The light lavender flowers show in late spring, and are sweetly fragrant. Thrives in any well drained soil, growing well even in heavy clay. USDA zones 4 - 9, and to zone 3 with protection.
Iris pallida 'Variegata'

Iris pallida 'Variegata' ('Aureovariegata')

$8.95   The heavenly fragrance of these flowers is reason enough to grow this iris, reminding some folks of grape soda or possibly vanilla. The flowering season is late spring to early summer. The flowers are a light lavender. Flower stems to 3 feet. Leaves to about 2 feet, and are striped in green and a light golden-cream. When planting, set a plant high enough in the ground so the top of the thickened rhizome is not completely buried by earth. And to flower well, more sun than shade is necessary. Hardy from USDA zones 4 - 9, and to zone 3 with protection.
Iris unguicularis 'Francis Wormsley'

Iris unguicularis 'Francis Wormsley'

$12.95   Flowers are a medium lavender-blue surrounding gold and white markings at the base of the petals. Each flower is three inches across. A valuable winter-flowering perennial, it is hardy in zones 7 to 9, and to zone 10 in the West. In favored locations it can survive even to zone 6. The leaves are evergreen and could be cut to the ground at the beginning of winter to better see the flowers. 'Frances Wormsley' is an especially vigorous grower.
Iris unguicularis 'Mary Barnard'

Iris unguicularis 'Mary Barnard'

$10.95   A dark purple is the color of 'Mary Barnard.' The petals are not as wide as other varieties of this winter-blooming plant. Flowers freely after her first couple of years in a new location. USDA zones 7 - 9, and to zone 10 in the West.
Iris unguicularis 'Walter Butt'

Iris unguicularis 'Walter Butt'

$10.95   'Walter Butt' has wide petals of very pale, pinkish lavender. Allow him two or three years to grow thickly enough, before expecting much flowering. For the first few years after planting you may doubt that it can flower for many months. It can and will for you in time. An older clump starts to flower in November and continues through winter into early spring. A clump that is a foot or more wide, can produce dozens of flowers in a season. A plant will stop flowering in the middle of winter when the temperature drops to +15°F, and resumes flowering when the temperature rises. Hardy to USDA zones 7 to 9, and to zone 10 in the West. Some gardeners have it survive into zone 6.
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